The Span Trust

The Span Trust was established in 2007 to reach out to the poor and needy. Over the years, we have started several projects like Girls’ Shelter home - Pune, Shining Light School - Pune, Project Karuna - Gulbarga, etc., which have enabled us in reaching out to the leprosy affected, disadvantaged children, facilitate micro finance, offer job oriented training and provide health care and safe water systems to needy people.

Recently, the SPAN Trust has helped Vijay Kumar, son of Maruthi –a leprosy-affected from Gandhi leprosy colony, Gulbarga. Maruthi is a burnt out leprosy patient with severe deformities to both hands and feet caused due to the after effect of the leprosy disease. Maruti and his wife have two boys. Vijay is their second son. Due to his deformities, Maruti finds it difficult to get anywhere and so has no alternatives but to resort to begging to look after and care for his family.

Vijay Kumar was born with a spinal disorder called Kyphoscoliosis. He is also a very late talker. He started speaking only when he was 6 yrs. old. His growth is also stunted due to malnutrition.

He was diagnosed by the Spine Surgeon of JISAR, Bangalore with Progressive Congenital Kyphoscoliosis. It was concluded that he would require surgery to straighten his spine which would be done with the help of 14 screws and 2 rods. It would be a delicate surgery of around 2-3 hours and would require at least a week’s hospitalisation. The total cost estimate was INR 430, 000. Vijay’s parents could not afford this.

The hospital, through a program, granted 50% of the fund of the total estimate. The Span Trust paid rest. Vijay was operated successfully on 25th of April 2017. He is doing well now and is able to walk straight.

Chanchal, Komal and Nirmala and are sisters from a slum in Pune. Their parents are unemployed and separated due to their father’s unfaithfulness. Mother is uneducated but tries selling balloons and garlands though this never provides enough for the family’s expenses.

When Komal and her sisters were younger they used to beg for food and money on the streets. Each evening they’d use the money they had collected to eat their only meal with their mother. Later their mother placed them in a Girls’ Hostel where they were treated cruelly.

We wanted to do something for them and asked the three sisters’ mother if we could take care of them. She was constantly afraid that her separated husband would take the girls away from her. She knew that life in the hostel was not good but after a prayer and persuasion, she handed the kids to us in June 2014.

Komal and her sisters are happy now. Komal thank God that she is saved from the inhuman behaviour in the hostel. She now gets to eat four good and hot meals a day and loves playing with her sisters and other children in the house. She says this is the best place she has lived in and never wants to go from here.